For the sprint

For sprinting, a very heavy lift, or other activities that are designed to kill me, I usually skip forward in my playlist to a house beat-heavy track that has the power to obliterate the thoughts of how much pain I’m in.

This one came to my attention after I heard it on Isles of Wonder: Music for the Opening Ceremony Of The London 2012 Olympic Games (don’t judge)(I know I’m way behind; this track was released in 2009).  I love the song for Dizzee’s energy and his east end accent.  I love it for the grimy beat that never really breaks into a more elegant disco melody.

And really, if we’ve evolved to a point where we’re forcing ourselves to run (or worse yet, to run on contraptions that replicate outdoor running) without being chased or hunting, aren’t we all a bit bonkers?

For the sprint

For sprinting, a very heavy lift, or other activities that are designed to kill me, I usually skip forward in my playlist to a house beat-heavy track that has the power to obliterate the thoughts of how much pain I’m in.

This one came to my attention after I heard it on Isles of Wonder: Music for the Opening Ceremony Of The London 2012 Olympic Games (don’t judge)(I know I’m way behind; this track was released in 2009).  I love the song for Dizzee’s energy and his east end accent.  I love it for the grimy beat that never really breaks into a more elegant disco melody.

And really, if we’ve evolved to a point where we’re forcing ourselves to run (or worse yet, to run on contraptions that replicate outdoor running) without being chased or hunting, aren’t we all a bit bonkers?

For the sprint was originally published on Katherineapolis

Workout Jam Wednesday

Every Wednesday, I’ll post a song from my workout playlist.  I still contend that creating workout playlists is more fun than actually working out.

To the people who can exercise to audio books or podcasts: Who the hell are you?  And can you teach me your ways?  I can’t really get through a run unless I have beats bouncing around in my skull, so here’s a song with a great tempo and a nice build-up that’s been a staple on multiple devices over the years:

fritz1

Why “Fritz Learns to Catch” deserves viral success

In the time it took me to write this post, this youtube video climbed for 790,000-some odd views to over 861,000 views.  It’s been shared with me by 3 different people today (to be fair, I do have a Golden named Charlie who fills up my various social media platforms with photos).  I’m not even mad; Fritz the Dog deserves all the viral success he’s had.  Here’s why:

This is a pet video that isn’t a cat video.  Everyone’s sick of cat videos.

The dog’s name is Fritz; Fritz’s bandanna game is flawless.

The video begins with this totally bizarre zoom over an ominous musical hum, letting everyone know that we’re in for a strange and glorious ride:

Steak? Pork chop?

The creator of the video could’ve chosen a totally cliche song like “Chariots of Fire” to illustrate Fritz’s trials and triumphs, but he didn’t.  He went with a peppy, unobtrusive and almost primitive-sounding techno jam.  It’s like having a MIDI video game theme play over all of Fritz’s attempts.  And doesn’t it feel like you’re in a video game?  This is a first-person shooter, but instead of James Bond’s gleaming pistol in GoldenEye 007 for N64, you’re controlling a hand that tosses large and easily recognizable food items into a perfect arc in the air.

And much like the best shoot-em-ups, the splatter sound effects in this video are absolute perfection.  I know they’ve been added in post-production, and I don’t care.

Controversial opinion: I think my favorite Fritz missed foodstuff is the donut.  But if you’re Team Taco or Team Hot Dog like everyone else, I’m open to arguments.

Witch, please

Circa 1692, The trial of George Jacobs for witchcraft at the Essex Institute in Salem, Massachusetts. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)

Circa 1692, The trial of George Jacobs for witchcraft at the Essex Institute in Salem, Massachusetts. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)

It’s not Halloween yet, but let’s get spooky: I’m beyond excited for Jenji Kohan’s new show for HBO about the Salem Witch Trials, The Devil May Know.  Kohan, of course, is the creator of Weeds and Orange is the New Black.  She’s stated in the past that the main characters of both those shows were “trojan horses”–basically, that putting white women at the centers of shows made them easier to sell.  Once on air, she could tell great stories about nonwhite and/or LGBT characters.  Might we learn more about Tituba with this new series?

One of my favorite historical theories (because I have several favorite historical theories (yes, I really do)) comes from this era.  Some believe

 that the hallucinatory fervor and lack of good judgment that year are the fault of an entire town gone mad, poisoned by their own food source:

“Caporael, now a behavioral psychologist at New York’s Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, soon noticed a link between the strange symptoms reported by Salem’s accusers, chiefly eight young women, and the hallucinogenic effects of drugs like LSD. LSD is a derivative of ergot, a fungus that affects rye grain. Ergotism — ergot poisoning — had indeed been implicated in other outbreaks of bizarre behavior… Toxicologists now know that eating ergot-contaminated food can lead to a convulsive disorder characterized by violent muscle spasms, vomiting, delusions, hallucinations, crawling sensations on the skin, and a host of other symptoms — all of which, Linnda Caporael noted, are present in the records of the Salem witchcraft trials. Ergot thrives in warm, damp, rainy springs and summers. When Caporael examined the diaries of Salem residents, she found that those exact conditions had been present in 1691.”

The real horror story, then, is what would happen today if we did away with the regulatory bodies like the FDA.

*~*~SpooOOoooOOooooky!~*~*